What to do while you wait for reconstruction…

 

What to do while you wait for reconstruction…

Waiting lists for breast reconstruction surgery can be long and there is no guarantee that you will have the surgery as scheduled. So many unexpected things can happen.

So what is a gal to do? You are feeling fine and you want to go out, get back to work or socialise. You just aren’t feeling very confident about your shape.

Guess what? You can wear a Bressanté breastform while you wait! Bressanté breastforms are soft, lightweight and comfortable. They are also fully adjustable so you can get the perfect fit whether you have had a lumpectomy or mastectomy. You can wear your existing wardrobe and you can get back to feeling like yourself really quickly. Whether it’s for a short time or a long time, wearing a Bressanté breastform is an option you should explore at www.shopprosthetics.com

Wardrobe Hacks After Mastectomy/Lumpectomy

Adapting your wardrobe after dealing with breast cancer can be challenging. Breast cancer treatment often leads to body changes such as weight loss or gain, loss of part or all of the breast or the loss of both breasts. As time goes by your body structure may shift and the way your muscles work will change. It’s a whole new world in terms of finding clothes that fit, flatter and make you feel good.

It is important to know that you don’t need to get rid of your existing wardrobe so don’t go and donate or throw away just yet. Here is a list of top 10 tips for adjusting your wardrobe to you can regain your confidence and feel like yourself again!

  1. Take some time to try things on; do this when you aren’t rushed or pressured. Have good lighting and a mirror available.
  2. Divide your clothes into 3 piles; Keep, Adjust or Repair & Say Goodbye
  3. The Keep and Adjust piles should be clothing that you really like, in fact only those outfits you can’t live without. Most of us have too much in our closets; now is a good time to discover the good and get rid of the clutter.
  4. Find a seamstress if you don’t sew. Even if you do sew a seamstress can guide you and help you identify what changes are needed to make a garment fit properly.
  5. Make sure your bra fits properly and your breast prosthesis restores symmetry and feels comfortable. Our Bressanté breast prostheses will do that for you because they are lightweight, soft and ADJUSTABLE. So important!
  6. Invite a friend with an eye for fashion to help you. Ask for his or her honest opinion about how an outfit looks. We are usually too critical about ourselves and the way we look. If the outfit doesn’t flatter or is uncomfortable you know what to do; say goodbye.
  7. With some minor alterations, your clothing can work for you. Consider where the garment is being worn and what you will be doing. Alterations may be different for evening wear as opposed to workout wear.
  8. Don’t sacrifice your personal style because you are self-conscious. There is probably a way to alter a favourite garment so you can enjoy wearing it again.
  9. Once you have purged, altered and feel good about your choices; buy something new. Outlet stores, second hand shops and swapping with friends are good ways to add something special to your wardrobe.
  10. Have fun dressing your new body. When you feel good about yourself it shows. Remember you have been through a lot. Be gentle and walk tall; you are awesome!

We have a pinterest page with FASHION INSPIRATION for women who have had a mastectomy. Check it out here and see some examples of what you will find below!

Benefits of Wearing a Bressanté breastform

Benefits of Wearing a Bressanté breastform:

  • No pain/complications that may be associated with reconstruction surgery; you will be super comfortable.
  • Clothing will fit better; symmetry is restored
  • You will look & feel more like yourself
  • You can use your existing wardrobe; less costly
  • A soft, lightweight Bressanté breastform will protect your sensitive chest.
  • Our breastforms are completely adjustable to get the perfect fit.

How long after a mastectomy/lumpectomy should I wait to wear a breastform?

This is a personal decision and is different for everyone. Women are often advised to wait 3 months after surgery before being fit with a breastform.

Most women need not wait that long. If your incision is well healed and you can comfortably wear a bra then you can be fit with a Bressanté breastform. Our breastforms are adjustable, lightweight and soft so it is perfectly safe to go for a personal fitting or to order your Bressante breastform online at www.shopprosthetics.com

Toronto Pop Up: A Huge Success

Our recent trip to Toronto was a great success. We met several groups of women that were really impressed with our prosthetics and were very enthusiastic about Bressante in general. 

Some of what our clients had to say:

“The Capri is so comfortable, that I won’t have to worry about my Christmas get-togethers this season!”

“I’ve been on a waiting list for reconstructive surgery for three years. Now that I’ve found the Capri, I’m off the list for good! Yay!”

“WHERE have you guys been hiding?? Women need to know about this!”

These comments energise us and we are going to continue spreading the word about how easy it is to be comfortable wearing a Bressante Capri breast form. 

Order yours online NOW!

Bra Day in Toronto

We at Bressante know that it is important for those experiencing breast cancer and mastectomy to know the options available to them after breast surgery. Attending Bra Day Toronto is one of the ways to gain insight, knowledge and hear of first-hand experience from real women who have been through it all. We had a great time making connections and networking when we attended in 2015, and we are sure looking forward to the event again tonight! We hope to bring awareness to our fitting event happening in Toronto on November 29th and 30th where we will be fitting women with prosthetics and bras and providing education about our products. Please stay tuned for more info on this event soon, and enjoy Bra Day tonight, Toronto!

Dr. Jen Gunter Speaks Out Against Misinformation About Women’s Health

JUSTIN SAMANSKI-LANGILLE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS
California-based doctor Jen Gunter poses Friday in her hotel lobby. Gunter is fighting medical quackery and pseudo-science in her spare time.
170811 – Friday, August 11, 2017.

 

The internet is a vast world of information. Sometimes it can be a challenge to sift through all of the false information to find the truth. Dr. Jen Gunter is one woman putting true, fact-based information out there about women’s health that we can feel certain is coming from an expert. She is a Winnipeg-raised obstetrician-gynecologist who has often spoken out against Gwyneth Paltrow’s website Goop, where Paltrow shares information and sells women’s health items such as a $55-66 jade egg for “vaginal cleansing”.

Read the Winnipeg Free Press article here.

 

 

 

Post-mastectomy fashion: 5 things I wish I’d known before my mastectomy

This article is from anaono.com check them out!

 

You were prepared for your treatment. You were prepared for your surgery. You read everything you could get your hands on when you were diagnosed with cancer. But nothing prepares you for the day when the post-mastectomy haze clears and you are standing at the mirror, wrapped up like a mummy, convinced the doctors accidentally stitched an elephant to your chest.

You blink at your new body and try to wiggle out of the robe that has become your go-to outfit of choice. Then you stare into your closet. This is not like those pre-cancer days of sighing about not having anything to wear; this is real. As you rack your brain, you realize there wasn’t anything in your research that talked about living life after the mastectomy.

But don’t worry, because I’ve been there. Many of us have. And we’re happy to share all the things we wish we’d known when it was time to ditch the flannel and start dressing like a woman again.

The first thing I noticed post-mastectomy and reconstruction was traditional lingerie no longer fit me. I had no idea putting something as simple as a bra on would be so challenging. I would say I wish I’d known that ahead of time, but in hindsight, not knowing is what put me in a position to change the lives of others and start dressing women after cancer with my lingerie line, AnaOno. Now I get to listen to a lot of women talking about their challenges after a mastectomy, and I know I am not the only one. And neither are you.

Read the rest of the article here.

Breast Changes: What is Normal?

We all know to regularly check our breasts for odd or new changes, as they can be a sign of something much more serious.

Most women have changes in their breasts during their lifetime. Many of these changes are caused by hormones or can be caused by the normal ageing process. Most of these changes are not cancer; they are called benign changes. However, if you notice a breast change and you have suspicions or are uncertain, don’t wait until your next mammogram. Make an appointment to get it checked.

  • Young women who have not gone through menopause often have more dense tissue in their breasts. The Dense tissue has more glandular and connective tissue and less fat tissue. This kind of tissue makes mammograms harder to interpret–because both dense tissue and tumours show up as solid white areas on x-ray images. Breast tissue gets less dense as women get older.
  • Before or during your menstrual periods, your breasts may feel swollen, tender, or painful. You may also feel one or more lumps during this time because of extra fluid in your breasts. These changes usually go away by the end of your menstrual cycle. Because some lumps are caused by normal hormone changes, your healthcare provider may have you come back for a return visit, at a different time in your menstrual cycle.
  • During pregnancy, your breasts may feel lumpy. This is usually because the glands that produce milk are increasing in number and getting larger.
  • While breastfeeding, you may get a condition called mastitis. This happens when a milk duct becomes blocked. Mastitis causes the breast to look red and feel lumpy, warm, and tender. It may be caused by an infection and it is often treated with antibiotics. Sometimes the duct may need to be drained. If the redness or mastitis does not go away with treatment, call your health care provider.
  • As you approach menopause, your menstrual periods may come less often. Your hormone levels also change. This can make your breasts feel tender, even when you are not having your menstrual period. Your breasts may also feel lumpier than they did before.
  • If you are taking hormones (such as menopausal hormone therapy, birth control pills, or injections) your breasts may become denser. This can make a mammogram harder to interpret. Be sure to let your healthcare provider know if you are taking hormones.
  • When you stop having menstrual periods (menopause), your hormone levels drop, and your breast tissue becomes less dense and fattier. You may stop having any lumps, pain, or nipple discharge that you used to have. And because your breast tissue is less dense, mammograms may be easier to interpret.

To read more, click on the link below!

https://www.cancer.gov/types/breast/understanding-breast-changes

Take This Survey and Make a Difference for Cancer Survivors Worldwide

Last year, Denise Stewart coordinated the first online Breast Cancer Summit. Experts from around the globe gave talks on subjects relevant to those who are facing changes and challenges after their breast cancer diagnosis and surgery. Many people took part in the online learning and now she is doing it all again! Answer a few of the questions from this online survey so that the Summit can offer what you need most!

“The Breast Cancer Rehabilitation & Wellness Summit being launched July 31 and the goal is to help people across the world take action to recover well after breast cancer.

Can you help guide us? We want to deliver the best online health Summit for breast cancer survivors. It will be the first ever online Breast Cancer Rehabilitation & Wellness Summit. We need to know your thoughts about what information you need to help you recover better.

Women and men across the world have similar difficulties during their recovery stage and when trying to achieve their best health and well-being after the intensive breast cancer treatment.

The Summit is a health awareness project to help people learn more about specific health problems and in this case, it is the many side effects and problems that arise after having a breast cancer diagnosis and medical treatment.”

Click the link below to enter the survey. It will only take about a minute to click through the questions.

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdC826-UUB4qsewPzUjSBQGrzp80Guq1nYi0b75rgLGNMShHw/viewform?c=0&w=1